Helping your child with Mathematics

 

Card games are a fun way to practise number skills.

Game 1 Odd/Even-Reading Numbers and identifying odd and even numbers.

(Number of players 2)

Two players place a deck of cards in front of them face down.  Kings, Jacks, Tens and Jokers are removed.  The Queens represent zero and the Aces represent one.  The two players take it in turns taking one card at a time.  Before they flip it over and read out the number they guess whether or not it is odd or even.  [A draft sheet could be made with odd numbers on one side and even numbers on the other side and place a counter on their guess before flipping the card.  This may stop arguments about what was and wasn’t said!] If a player guesses correctly he/she keeps the card.  If he guesses incorrectly the card is given to his/her partner.  Keep playing until the cards have all been used.  The player with the most cards wins that game.  Cards are shuffled and a new game begins.

Game 2 Making Ten-Addition

All picture cards and tens are removed leaving numbers 1-9.  Place 9 cards face up in three rows of three similar to the channel 9 logo on TV. The remainder of the deck are placed on top of the cards face up until all are gone leaving the nine pils of cards.

Players take turns collecting two cards that when added together make ten.  This continues until all cards are removed. Players need to say aloud the combinations as they collect the pairs.

Game 3 High Card– Addition

Two players place a deck of cards in front of them face down. Remove the Kings, Jacks and Jokers.  The Ace represents the number one and the Queen represents a zero.  All other cards are face value.

Players share out all the cards and place their cards in front of them in one pile.  Player one turns over his/her top two cards and adds them up ie. 7 and 10 =17. Player two then turns over his her top two cards hoping to get a higher score than player one.  Whoever has the higher score takes all 4 cards and places them at the bottom of their pack. Play continues until all cards are used.  Player with the most cards is the winner.

 

 

The Department of Education and Early Childhood Education has provided the following article about ways to help your child with literacy at home.
http://www.education.vic.gov.au/Documents/school/parents/primary/201b4toyear2mathstips.pdf

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Card games are a great way to not only improve your Mathematical skills but fun for everyone! Here are a few card games to play;

CHANNEL 9 LOGO GAME

Take a pack of cards

In our Prep Learning Community we have been using card games to help us build on our number facts to 10.

One of the games we play is Channel 9 Logo game

Take a pack of cards, remove all the picture cards.

Deal the remaining cards out face up in a 3 x 3 grid.

There are two ways you can go with the game, select pairs (4 and 4) or select cards that add to 10. For example 7 and 3.

Once your child is confident with this encourage them to look at other ways of making 10. (5 and 2 and 3)

Addition Quick Draw – 2 players

Getting Ready

Deal out all of the cards to the two players.

Play the Game

One player calls, ‘Draw’ and both players turn over their top card

and place it face up in the center.

The players add the two numbers that are showing and the first

player to say the total out loud wins the two cards.

After all cards have been used, the players count the number of

cards that they have won. The winner is the person who has the

most cards.

Please feel free to let us know if you think of any other variations of the game.

This new twist on the old classic Go Fish! helps kids to learn addition by mentally working out simple math problems. Each round played practices math facts for a specific number, making it easy to stick with one set of facts for as long as needed to solidify them in the players’ mind.

All that’s needed to play this game is a standard deck of playing cards. It is best enjoyed with 2-4 players.

How to Play Go Fish!

1. Sort through the deck to remove all cards that are higher than that featured number for the math game. For example, if the goal is to learn addition facts for the number seven, the game will be played with ones (aces) through sevens.

2. Deal out five cards to each player and place the remaining cards in a draw pile.

3. Have each player look through his or her hand of cards to find any pairs that add up to the featured number and place them face up in their discard pile. For example, if learning addition facts for the number seven, appropriate pairs would be 6+1, 5+2 or 4+3. The 7 card would also be laid aside as a correct solution that doesn’t require a pair.

4. The person to the left of the dealer may now ask any other player for a card that will help create the sum required. If the person asked has the card in his hand, he must give it up to the player that made the request. A player can keep asking for cards until no further matches are able to be made, at which point he is told to Go Fish! from the draw pile and the next player takes a turn trying to make a match.

5. If a player runs out of cards he can choose five more cards from the draw pile to stay in the game.

6. Continue playing until all the cards in the deck have been matched into pairs. The player with the highest number of pairs at the end of the game is the winner.

Learning Addition Facts by Playing Memory

The card game Memory, or Concentration, is another great game that can be modified to teach addition facts to kids. As with the instructions for Go Fish! above, each game focuses on math facts for a specific number.

All that’s needed to play this game is a standard deck of playing cards. It can be played alone or with a group.

How to Play Memory

1. Sort through the deck to remove all cards that are higher than that featured number for the math game. For example, if the goal is to learn addition facts for the number six, the game will be played with ones (aces) through sixes.

2. Shuffle the deck and turn all the cards face down in a grid pattern.

3. Taking turns, have each player flip two cards to look for a matching pair. For example, if learning addition facts for the number six, appropriate pairs would be 5+1, 4+2 or 3+3. The 6 card would also be laid aside as a correct solution that doesn’t require a pair.

4. Continue playing until all the cards in the deck have been matched into pairs. The player with the highest number of pairs at the end of the game is the winner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Counting!

Its important that your child continues to practise counting. This may be setting the table and counting how many knives and forks they have or counting the clothes in the washing basket. The children can sort them into groups and compare groups using ‘more’ or ‘less’.

Children are also encouraged to play board games such as Snakes and Ladders, Trouble, Connect Four etc to practise rolling the dice and moving the correct number of spaces.

The Prep children have been busy learning different card games to assist with their learning. In particular ‘Snap’ and ‘Go Fish’. We have been practising taking turns and saying the number.

 

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